Price: $2,999.00
Length: 3 Days
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IPv6 Systems Engineering – World’s first course when it comes to Engineering IPv6 Networks

Learn about all aspects of IPv6 Systems engineering including: ConOps, systems requirements, system architecture, design, implementation and migration, configuration, change management, maintenance and operations, security, availability, performance, reliability and safety.

IPv6 Systems Engineering Training Crash Course is an excellent course where IPv6 plays a mission critical role in managing and controlling mission critical systems.

IPv6 systems engineering

 

For the last 15 years, TONEX has been involved in designing and engineering Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). We understand what it takes to create an IPv6 network considering of security, reliability, performance and safety.

IPv6 Systems Engineering Training Course introduces IPv6 Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC) and Agile methods.

Learn how to:

  • Plan and assess your  IPv6 infrastructure requirements
  • Create a detailed set of engineering requirements, architecture  design and  operation to include mission critical aspects of your IPv6 needs of your organization
  • Plan, architect and  engineer and configure a solid IPv6 system with cutting edge and secure technologies and strategies
  • Plan, architect, engineer, document and evaluate your organization’s IPv6 test and evaluation plan, verification, validation, integration and operation.
  • Provide your organization with an effective  IPv6 implementation plan
  • Protect your IPv6 infrastructure with the latest security procedures

Who Should Attend

Systems engineers, network engineers, IPv6 security specialists, systems analysts, project managers, systems architect and anyone else involved in engineering IPv6 networks.

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