Length: 2 Days
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Introduction to Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

The advantage of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and SysML is the ability to create models/diagrams for the system instead of using documents.

When the systems engineer defines or creates something in a diagram, the SysML tool maintains consistency in all the other diagrams in a process called traceability.

While MBSE has been around for a few years now, that doesn’t mean it’s not evolving like so many other systems engineering disciplines. One of the biggest trends for MBSE is the growing realization that MBSE is not a function of any one software tool, not PLM, not SysML, not requirements.

The goal is the Digital Thread, the complete set of domain models organized, connected and version-managed in a way that allows everyone on the development team to find the data they need to do their jobs. Each discipline and each organization have a seat at the MBSE table.

Implementation of the digital thread is still incremental in every enterprise. Early adopters look for specific integrations that enhance collaboration between team members, speeding completion of tasks and reducing errors from domain model inconsistencies. As they implement the Digital Thread more fully, they realize even greater gains in model validation and verification, which allows deeper exploration of the system design space within project schedules.

Another trend on the MBSE horizon is how the engineering software tools and the digital thread infrastructure that connects them are all becoming scalable enterprise applications, sharing services and data either in the cloud or in on-premises servers.

Standard interfaces such as RESTful or OSLC APIs are expected to help support this, but the great heterogeneity of data, models and use cases will handicap approaches that restrict themselves to these technologies.

Over the past 13 years MBSE has become widely adopted by systems engineers as part of a long-term trend toward model-centric approaches adopted by other engineering disciplines, including mechanical, electrical and software.

In particular, MBSE is expected to completely replace the document-centric approach that has been practiced by systems engineers in the past and to influence the future practice of systems engineering by being fully integrated into the definition of systems engineering processes.

Industries that stand to benefit from the MBSE approach can be conveniently grouped into 12 sectors: transportation and mobility, aerospace and defense, industrial equipment, energy and utilities, architecture and construction, life sciences, high-tech, marine and offshore, financial and business services, consumer goods and retail, natural resources, and consumer packaged goods and retail.

Introduction to Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Course by Tonex

Introduction to Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is a 2-day introduction to MBSE. Learn about modeling, modeling applied to systems engineering, Systems Modeling Language (SysML) application and more.

Participants will learn how MBSE is applied and how modern system engineering uses models to create structural and dynamic artifacts for conops, system requirements, design, architecture, analysis verification and validation activities. Through case studies and examples, participants will discover application of modeling to systems engineering, the model-based approach to analysis, requirements, design and testing.

For systems engineers, developers, testers, and project managers, Systems Modeling Language (SysML) represents system-related information in static and dynamic diagrams applicable to the system acquisition.

Introduction to MBSE, will explain advantage of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and SysML and the ability to create models/diagrams for the system instead of documents.

Who Should Attend?

Developers, systems engineers, testers, project managers, analysts and anyone else who wants to learn the application of modeling to modern systems engineering practices.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the attendees will be able to:

  • Describe models and Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)
  • Describe what SysML is
  • Explore model-based systems engineering approach
  • List SysML diagrams and language concepts
  • Apply SysML as part of a model based SE process applied to design and manufacturing
  • Develop a system conceptual model and architecture using MBSE/SysML
  • Define system use cases, requirements, architecture, function, structure, behavior and tests with SysML
  • Describe the notions of system, product, service, and project with SysML
  • Model a combined Project-Product Life cycle Management system and study the benefits of the project-product synergies with SysML
  • Work with real life projects using MBSE approach with SysML

Course Agenda

Overview of Model Based Systems Engineering (SE)

  • Systems Engineering Overview and Models
  • Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Applied
  • Systems Engineering Practices for Describing Complex Systems
  • SysML Language Overview
  • Analyzing
  • Stakeholders Involved in System Acquisition
  • System Actors, Use Cases, Specifications, Interface requirements, System design, Analysis & Trade-off and Test plans

Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) vs. Document-Based Systems Engineering

  • Models and Principles behind MBSE
  • Systems Engineering Artifacts and transitions to MBSE
  • Modeling at multiple levels of the System
  • Operational model
  • System model
  • Component model
  • MBSE to support complex predictive and affects-based modeling
  • Relationship between SysML and MBSE

Overview of  SysML

  • Diagram Overview and Language Concepts
  • What is SysML?
  • SysML Diagram Taxonomy
  • Systems including hardware, software, data, personnel, procedures, and facilities
  • SysML in specification, analysis, design, verification, and validation of systems
  • Functional/Behavioral Model
  • Shared understanding of system requirements and design

SysML Diagram Techniques

  • Use Case
  • Requirement
  • Activity
  • Block Definition
  • Internal Block
  • Sequence
  • State Machine
  • Parametric
  • Package
  • Allocation Tables

Working with MBSE and SysML

  • Simple Case Study Structure: Definition and Use
  • Behavior: Interaction, State Machine and activity/functions
  • Requirements
  • Parametrics
  • SysML Diagram Frames
  • Package Diagram
  • Views
  • Internal Block Diagram
  • Allocations
  • Basic Structural elements

Workshop

  • Working with a Simple System Modeling Example and Functional Analysis using SysML
  • Structure and Concepts

Introduction to Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

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